Cured Too: A Cancer Story: A Film By David Triplett

Cured Too: A Cancer Story: A Film By David Triplett

This is a documentary of how myself and others cured our cancers using an alternative and controversial treatment: cannabis oil. It’s a proven fact that CBD and THC, two of many components in cannabis, shrink tumors and cure cancer. This documentary shows my cancer being cured and explores the history and politics of cannabis and cancer. You will also see samples of many antique cannabis medicine bottles.

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Active Ingredient in Cannabis Kills Cancer Cells in Brain

LabNew research out of Spain suggests that THC — the active ingredient in marijuana — appears to prompt the death of brain cancer cells.

The finding is based on work with mice designed to carry human cancer tumors, as well as from an analysis of THC’s impact on tumor cells extracted from two patients coping with a highly aggressive form of brain cancer.

Explaining that the introduction of THC into the brain triggers a cellular self-digestion process known as “autophagy,” study co-author Guillermo Velasco said his team has isolated the specific pathway by which this process unfolds, and noted that it appears “to kill cancer cells, while it does not affect normal cells.”

Velasco is with the department of biochemistry and molecular biology in the School of Biology at Complutense University in Madrid. The findings were published in the April issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation.

The Spanish researchers focused on two patients suffering from “recurrent glioblastoma multiforme,” a fast-moving form of brain cancer. Both patients had been enrolled in a clinical trial designed to test THC’s potential as a cancer therapy.

Using electron microscopes to analyze brain tissue taken both before and after a 26- to 30-day THC treatment regimen, the researchers found that THC eliminated cancer cells while it left healthy cells intact.

The team also was able, in what it described as a “novel” discovery, to track the signaling route by which this process was activated.

These findings were replicated in work with mice, which had been “engineered” to carry three different types of human cancer tumor grafts.

“These results may help to design new cancer therapies based on the use of medicines containing the active principle of marijuana and/or in the activation of autophagy,” Velasco said.

Outside experts suggested that more research is needed before advocating marijuana as a medicinal intervention for brain cancer.

Dr. John S. Yu, co-director of the Comprehensive Brain Tumor Program in the Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said the findings were “not surprising.”

“There have been previous reports to this effect as well,” he said. “So this is yet another indication that THC has an anti-cancer effect, which means it’s certainly worth further study. But it does not suggest that one should jump at marijuana for a potential cure for cancer, and one should not urge anyone to start smoking pot right away as a means of curing their own cancer.”

But that’s exactly what many brain cancer patients have been doing, said Dr. Paul Graham Fisher, the Beirne Family director of Neuro-Oncology at Stanford University.

“In fact, 40 percent of brain tumor patients in the U.S. are already using alternative treatments, ranging from herbals to vitamins to marijuana,” he said. “But that actually points out a cautionary tale here, which is that many brain cancer patients are already rolling a joint to treat themselves, but we’re not really seeing brain tumors suddenly going away as a result, which we clearly would’ve noticed if it had that effect. So we need to be open-minded. But this suggests that the promise of THC might be a little over-hoped, and certainly requires further investigation before telling people to go out and roll a joint.”

By Alan Mozes

HealthDay Reporter
April 2

More information

For additional details on the risks and benefits of marijuana use as it relates to cancer, visit the National Cancer Institute or the American Cancer Society.

SOURCES: Guillermo Velasco, Ph.D., department of biochemistry and molecular biology, School of Biology, Complutense University, Madrid; John S. Yu, M.D., co-director, Comprehensive Brain Tumor Program, Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles; Paul Graham Fisher, M.D., associate professor, neurology, pediatrics, and neurosurgery and human biology and the Beirne Family Director of Neuro-Oncology, Stanford University; April 2009, The Journal of Clinical Investigation

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Cannabidiol (CBD) “Turns Off” the Cancer Gene Involved in Metastasis Findings by Scientists at California Pacific Medical Center gives Scientific Support for Cannabis Science Initiatives

products_overviewNew studies by Scientists at California Pacific Medical Center, have shown that cannabidiol, (CBD), has the ability to “turn off” a gene that causes breast and other types of cancers to metastasize, according to the San Francisco Chronicle newspaper.

NBC News reports, “The drug “has been shown to reduce pain and nausea” in cancer patients. AIDS patients also use cannabis to eat, sleep and otherwise be more functional. Turns out that cannabidiol has none of the psychotropic effects of marijuana as a whole. The researchers hope to move to clinical trials on humans soon to test the cannabidiol inhibition of metastasis, reported in the San Francisco Chronicle. “What they found is that the cannabinoid turns off the overexpression of ID-1, which makes the cells lose their ability to travel to distant tissues. In other words, it keeps the cells more local and blocks their ability to metastasize. (spread to a new location) The researchers stressed cannabidiol works only on cancer cells that have these high levels of ID-1 and these do not include all cancerous tumors but, rather, aggressive, metastatic cells. But they’ve found such high levels in leukemia, colorectal, pancreatic, lung, ovarian, brain and other cancers.”

Cannabis Science appreciates this additional scientific support that this report provides for our two target drug development programs as the Company moves forward with CS-TATI-1, and based on the success of previous skin cancer patients who self-administered cannabis-based treatments, the Company is focusing on the use of CS-S/BCC-1 topical cannabis-based preparations for the treatment of basal and squamous cell carcinomas.

Dr. Robert Melamede states, “Cannabis Science is excited for the increasing scientific support for our projects. In the near future, we will share new developments, as well a the progress we have made with our earlier defined initiatives. Our professional expansion and development, as detailed in our latest news releases,was driven by the science of how cannabinoids can benefit both HIV/AIDS and Cancer Patients.”

San Francisco Chronicle: http://www.sfgate.com/health/article/Pot-compound-seen-as-tool-against-cancer-3875562.php#page-1

About CS-S/BCC-1

Cannabis Science is currently working with CBR International to develop a Pre-IND Application to the FDA that focuses on the use of CS-S/BCC-1 topical cannabis-based preparations for the treatment of basal and squamous cell carcinomas. Cannabis Science has already seen success with 4 self-medicated skin cancer patients. These patients have been self-administering using cannabis-based extracts applied topically to their carcinomas and tumors. These patients have experienced shrinking and apparent eradication of their skin cancer, backed by positive reports from their doctors, which is why the Company is confident about the eminent success of this new drug to be developed.

About CS-TATI-1

Data published in March by researchers at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine found that cannabinoids inhibit TAT induced migration to TAT via cannabinoid 2 receptors (CB2). Funding for the Mount Sinai study was provided by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical and Translational Science Award Grant. Cannabis Science’s research of CS-TATI-1 will be targeted to newly diagnosed patients infected with drug resistant virus, treatment experienced patients with drug-resistant HIV strains, and those intolerant of currently available therapies. Cannabis Science will be pursuing a wide range of NIH based Federal Research Programs such as RO1’s, PO1’s and SBIRS which exist to support preclinical development of target validation and proof of concept studies. Cannabis Science will be pursing implementation of these studies through collaborations with leading scientific institutions. Cannabis Science will also be pursuing other clinical research collaborations including the AIDS Clinical Trials Groups (ACTG), the Canadian AIDS Trial Network (CATN) and the European AIDS Trial Network (EATN).

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Researchers Say Compound in Cannabis Plant Could Cure Cancer

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A compound found in marijuana is now gaining some attention and its not THC.  Bay area researchers say CBD or Cannabidiol is showing signs of fighting cancerous cells.

Medicinal marijuana supporters believe THC helps terminally ill patients relieve pain and some have medical research to back it. But new research into a different compound found in the leafy green is said to possibly have more medical benefits than any other pharmaceutical drug in the market.

“We are at a point where we can finally say that CBD can inhibit and possibly reverse cancer cell growth and to me that’s a eureka moment!” said Kevin Saunders, who grows medicinal marijuana in Marina.

The research is pioneered by the California Pacific Medical Center in the Bay Area. The team tested the compound on animals and found there was disruption in growth of tumor cells when CBD was used and Saunders said they believe it has to do with a natural defense mechanism in the plant.  

Saunders said CBD makes up 40 percent of the cannabis plant matter. But the difference between CBD and THC is that CBD is non-toxic part of cannabis that is non-psychoactive, in other words, doesn’t get you high. 

“We can manipulate through breeding, it will allow high CBD, low THC levels, and that brings down the psychoactive effect that some people find marijuana gives them,” said Saunders.  

 

Bay Area researchers are now trying to get funding to begin testing CBD on humans. They have created two models, one for brain cancer and one for breast cancer.

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University of Reading – Cannabis discovery could lead to new epilepsy treatments

Scientists at the University of Reading have demonstrated for the first time that a previously unstudied chemical in cannabis could lead to more effective treatments for people with epilepsy.

Read more: http://www.reading.ac.uk/news-and-events/releases/PR464765.aspx

Humbolt State University launches research institute devoted to cannabis!

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ARCATA, Calif. (AP) — A public university located in one of California’s prime pot-growing regions has formed an academic institute devoted to marijuana.

The Humboldt Institute for Interdisciplinary Marijuana Research at Humboldt State University plans to sponsor scholarly lectures and coordinate research among 11 faculty members from fields such as economics, geography, politics, psychology and sociology.

The Times-Standard of Eureka reports (http://bit.ly/V5H8zy ) that one professor is studying recent campaigns to legalize marijuana, while another is investigating the environmental effects of pot cultivation.

“If anyone is going to have a marijuana institute, it really should be Humboldt State,” economist Erick Eschker, the institute’s co-chair, told the newspaper. Eschker is studying the connection between marijuana production and employment in the county.

The institute is probably the first dedicated to examining marijuana through the lens of multiple disciplines, according to sociologist Josh Meisel, who is leading the enterprise with Eschker. Humboldt faculty started discussing the idea in 2010 when California was preparing to vote on a bitterly contested ballot proposition that would have treated marijuana like alcohol.

“With these public discussions, there were a lot more questions than there were answers,” Meisel said, adding that he and other faculty became interested in applying academic rigor to the economic, health and legal issues raised in eventually unsuccessful campaign.

Now that voters in Colorado and Washington have done what California would not, passing marijuana legalization measures this month, the institute has even more reason to exist. Politics professor Jason Plume is giving a lecture on the marijuana reform movement on Tuesday night, one of seven public talks the institute plans to host this year.